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Dumpster Art... A Unique Project

The understanding I have is that Aubie Gregg, the lady on the left critically inspecting the image painted on this dumpster, is the instigator for this project. Helping her here are husband Issac and "sister" Gretchen (whose last name I don't know). Usually though, there would have been one or more kids from a counselling program for children with problems along with them.

And, well, that's what the project is... painting dumpsters as a way to provide a community service and at the same time teach troubled children how to mix creativity and social responsibility.

The results are fantastic. There are several other dumpsters not pictured here that eventually I'll photograph too and hopefully be able to add.

A few have comments, but mostly I am speechless...

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Snowy Owl 1

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Snowy Owl 2

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Unity Within Diversity

This is a bit of interesting social engineering. Barrow was the birth place of the Inuit Circumpolar Conference (1977), and recently hosted the annual convention of the organization designed to foster unity within the diverse community of circumpolar Arctic people. The symbol above the word "Inuit" has been adopted by the ICC to represent all Arctic cultures and people. And indeed, the term "Inuit" has also been adopted by the ICC, but has never been well received in Alaska. Yupik Eskimos are not Inuit Eskimos, but even the Inuit people in Alaska have never called themselves Inuit, and much prefer the term Inupiat.

This particular dumpster was done just to help people become comfortable with the terms and symbols.

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Elders

Respect for elders has always been a very significant part of Eskimo cultures. With an oral tradition, elders serve as the community library. They carry the archived knowledge base for the culture with them, and their significance is great.

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Symbols of life...

This Dumpster was signed by three different artists. Loco in the upper left corner, David Elavgak in the lower center, and Walter Nayakik in the lower right.

The drawings may not be recognizable to others. Across the top, starting on the left, there is an Eskimo drum, a pair of mukluks, a walrus, a woman dancing, and a umiaq skin boat. The second group across show a parka, a bowhead whale and a snowmachine. Across the bottom there is a blanket used for the blanket toss (yes, they are square, not round), and two whaling boats with outboard motors.

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I Am Soooo Confused... :-)

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Unknown Symbols

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Back to the 1960's?

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Two Whales, Plus I Don't Know What

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This is Real Hands On Work

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The Kiita Learning Center

The "ii" in Kiita on the sign is made in the image of an arch made from the jaw bones of bowhead whales.

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The Kiita Learning Center Dumpster

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More Hands on Respect

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Two Bowheads, and a Quote.

This one is fascinating. This dumpster is for a popular local restaurant located in the building on the right.

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Last update: October 10, 2007

Copyright 2007 Floyd L. Davidson

floyd@apaflo.com