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Image 1

At Natchik and Egasak Streets

This image is looking just west of due north, at the end of Natchik Street in Barrow. This is about 400 yards from where I live. The foreground is a "parking area", at the edge of the beach, and has been filled in and graded level. Note the ice chunks are about 14-15 inches thick, as this is all ice that formed this year.
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Image 2

At Natchik and Egasak Streets

Same location as the previous image, but looking a bit east of North.
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Image 3

At Kiogak and Stevenson Streets

An area where the ice actually came close, or did, climb right up onto the road. The road here, seen on the left, gets washed out by wave action in virtually every wind storm if there is no ice to protect it!
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Image 4

Stevenson Street between C and Ahmaogak Avenues

The image below is of the beach on the far side of Browerville, or about a mile and a half or so farther northeast than the previous images. The ridge of ice is the edge of the shore ice, which normally would be maybe 30 feet over the bank. No ice came close to the road here.
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Image 5

Stevenson Street at Brower Streets

The image is Browerville (northeast of Barrow) looking southwest. To get a perspective on how much ice this ridge represents, not that just to the left of that last building is a pile of snow. That isn't ice, that's snow from clearing drifts out of the parking lot of Brower's Cafe. You can see, just to the left of the pile of snow is a whale bone arch, which is probably the most photographed thing in Barrow. Another photo essay, about umiaq boats , shows where it is and what is there.
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Image 6

Stevenson Street between Ogrook and Egasak Streets

The next image was taken in Barrow, farther south along the beach than the others. It gives a pretty good perspective on how much movement inland there actually was, because you can actually see both sides of the ridge of ice.

Another view from this vantage point, taken in th fall of 2005, presents a very different environment.
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Image 7

Stevenson Street between Ogrook and Egasak Streets

The last picture was taken in the same location as the one above, except this is looking straight out into the ocean. Note the long pan of flat smooth ice. That is basically "shore ice" that has formed in place and has not significantly moved. Farther out there are ice ridges as far as one can see. Those result from the continuous movement of the ice pack. It is possible that some of the ice in that picture, most notably the chunk sticking up above the rest over on the right side, is multi-year ice that has been drifted here from the main icepack (that in the summer time is 2-300 miles distant).
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Last update: September 26, 2010

Copyright 2006, 2010 Floyd L. Davidson